How to Cover up Borrowed Lights/Interior Windows

Many houses that were built in the 1970s had windows built in above the door frames to add more light into dark hallways. These were known as borrowed lights or sometimes fanlights depending on what part of the country you come from. They are effective in the daytime but irritating at night as the other bedroom lights shine through.

I quizzed my neighbours to see if anyone else had blocked their windows up and their responses ranged from a professional board up job using a carpenter, to covering with emulsion or gloss, fabric, window blackout film for cars, Fablon and even a black bin liner!

I decided that the quickest and most cost effective way was to use good old fashioned sticky back plastic, Fablon which is seeing something of a revival and now known as D C Fix.

All it took was a quick wipe over of the window and frame, measure up, then cut the plastic to size using the square grid on the back of the paper as a guide to ensure straight lines. It’s quick easy to apply, but smooth out with an old credit card or store card. 100% effective. We used black initially but I then changed it to white. It is available in a multitude of colours and patterns.

Currently on sale in Wilkos for £3.50 a roll which will do 2 windows with some left over. Large rolls on Ebay.

Before:
how to cover up borrowed lights interior windows above doors 1 copy

After:how to cover up borrowed lights interior windows above doors copy
I then decided that the black was indeed too dark in the daytime so I replaced with white which still blocks out the light during the night.

doors with windows above covered with fablon

Have you tried this?
Or found another great use for Fablon?
Please share any tips with us in the comments below.

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2 thoughts on “How to Cover up Borrowed Lights/Interior Windows

    • Hi there, thanks for your question. We found it came off easily. Just rewash the window with hot soapy water and use a glass scraper if there is any sticky residue left. You can buy these very cheaply in Poundland/Dollar Tree.

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